Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inducts first woman

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inducts first woman



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In 1986, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame announced its first group of inductees: Buddy Holly, Chuck Berry, Elvis Presley, Fats Domino, James Brown, Jerry Lee Lewis, Little Richard, Ray Charles, Sam Cooke and the Everly Brothers. Since then, the Hall has added a new class of inductees each year, expanding by January 2008 to 209 honorees in four categories: Performers, Non-Performers, Sidemen and Lifetime Achievers. The category in which the Hall is most conspicuously lacking, however, is women. Fewer than 100 female performers have been added since the Hall admitted its first woman—Aretha Franklin—on January 3, 1987.

In its second 10 years, women fared better with the Hall of Fame as artists like the Jefferson Airplane (1996), Joni Mitchell (1997), Bonnie Raitt (2000) and the Pretenders (2005) became eligible for induction. Stevie Nicks made history in 2019 by being the first female artist to be inducted twice (first with Fleetwood Mac, in 1998, then as a solo artist).


41 Women Who Should Be In The Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame

So why isn't Dolly Parton in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame?

Fairfax Media Archives/Getty Images

The latest round of Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductions were announced today, and Whitney Houston is the only woman honored. This visible problem offers yet another chance to decry the gender imbalance within Cleveland's canonizing institution, an inequity that's been reported again and again, most powerfully by my friend and colleague Evelyn McDonnell, who crunched some numbers recently and came up with a staggeringly low percent of representation for women.

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Women Make Up Less Than 8% Of Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Inductees

Since feminists began throwing light on this subject, many have made lists of potential women inductees, but perhaps these efforts haven't gone far enough. In the spirit of aggressively pointing out the obvious, here's a playlist list of women who could be in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, consisting (mostly) of artists who issued debut recordings in every year represented by the inductions so far. You'll note that this challenges narrow definitions of rock and roll — which is exactly what needs to happen, and is happening, as the Hall strives to remain relevant and historically accurate. Women have long expanded frameworks that otherwise wouldn't accommodate them. Gender balance at the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame solves more than just a simple numbers problem – as diversity in practice always does.

Julie London: The artist who connected torch singing to teen angst, Julie London has influenced everyone from Annie Lennox to Lana Del Rey. She made Justin Timberlake cry a river, why isn't she in the Hall?

Janis Martin: The "My Boy Elvis" singer is too often classified as a novelty, but her chops and verve make her just as representative of rock's first generation as peers like Presley or Gene Vincent.

Patsy Cline: Never simply confined to the country genre, the legendary Cline showed both the raw emotion and willingness to transcend musical boundaries that rock and roll supposedly pioneered.

Connie Francis: The top singles artist of the late 1950s, Francis embodied teenage girls' yearnings – the rocket fuel that made rock and roll run – but was, for too long, considered too "pop" for the Hall. Such distinctions make no sense in the era of Ariana Grande.

Carole King: "But she's in as a songwriter (in partnership with her ex-husband, Gerry Goffin)!" That weak argument has stood between King and the placement she rightly deserves for too long. Tapestry is one of the biggest-selling albums of all time and the definitive emotional soundtrack for countless women and men of the baby boom. The most egregious omission, many would say.

Miriam Makeba: The Hall needs to expand its scope in many ways, including internationally. Makeba connected Africa to the West and still stands as the founding figure of the mutable category of "world music." Plus, that majestic voice.

Carla Thomas: If you believe in Memphis, you believe in Carla Thomas. The signature female voice of the time and place that made Elvis possible.

Barbra Streisand: Inducting La Barbra would make great strides in eradicating the prejudices against pop that long concealed sexism and, to some extent, racist tendencies within the Hall. (Disco is black music, friends.) Gaga's revival of A Star Is Born reminded people that Barbra showed how Hollywood glam and rock excess could combine in the 1970s, and she remains one of America's most charismatic stars.

Dolly Parton OR Loretta Lynn: Just choose one. They both changed much more than country music. They changed the way Southern women, all American women really, could speak their minds.

Buffy Sainte-Marie: Folk's first leading woman artist, alongside Odetta, Buffy Sainte-Marie was also a pioneer in the studio, recording the first album to employ quadraphonic vocals, and one of the first synth-driven albums, with 1969's Illuminations. A fearless voice that must be more widely acknowledged.

Astrud Gilberto: Brazilian music hugely influenced American soul, jazz and – yes – rock in the 1960s and 1970s, and no voice conveyed its elastic sense of time and understanding of intimacy more gracefully than Gilberto's. She's much more than just the "Girl From Ipanema."

Karen Carpenter: The queen of contemplative pop, whose reputation has been rehabilitated by young critics and musicians who understand the power in her soft approach, is as influential on current pop as any screaming rocker. She released her first single in 1966.

Sandy Denny: Besides defining English folk-rock in Fairport Convention and through her stunning solo work, Denny sang on Led Zeppelin's "Battle of Evermore" and made a brief appearance on the Who's Tommy. Her bold brilliance inspired 1970s rock queens like Ann Wilson of Heart and Stevie Nicks.

Emmylou Harris: The Hall came around to the truth about who really invented California country rock when it inducted Linda Ronstadt in 2014, but still hasn't made room for Harris, an equal player in establishing the blend of roots and innovation at the heart of modern country and Americana music.

Roberta Flack: As the scholar Jason King has eloquently argued, Flack defined the driving force within what would become both quiet storm music and hip-hop soul: vibe. Her work in the 1970s and 1980s is as adventurous as Joni Mitchell's and arguably as influential as Stevie Wonder's.

Fanny: The first all-woman band to put out an album on a major label, Fanny captured the attention of important men like the Beatles and David Bowie, but its influence on these titans is rarely acknowledged.

Carly Simon: As witty a social commentator as Randy Newman and as heartfelt a memoirist as her most-gossiped-about husband James Taylor, Simon was the most glamorous Everywoman in an era when feminism and pop pushed each other into new territory.

Tanya Tucker: She's currently enjoying a much-deserved revival that should get her into the Country Music Hall of Fame (at least!), but Tucker brought rock and roll spirit into country in new ways as a teen sensation and, later, an adult crossover star.

Valerie Simpson: This living deity of contemporary R&B should be inducted alongside her late husband, Nick Ashford: not only did they write classics like "Ain't No Mountain High Enough," their own duets, especially "Solid," made them the power couple in R&B for decades.

Pat Benatar: A people's rocker who has also never shied away from artistic innovation or social commentary – remember her epic "Hell is for Children," decrying child abuse? – Benatar was a favorite among fan voters this year.

Grace Jones: Mistaken by some as a disco diva, Jones is an artiste whose work explodes genre her style marked the high point of New Wave. "Pull Up to the Bumper" funked the 1980s into a new phase.

The Runaways: Joan Jett got her due in 2015, but the band that brought her to prominence remains neglected, maybe due to longstanding prejudices against so-called "manufactured" groups. The women of the Runaways proved that it's not how you begin but where you go that defines rock and roll spirit. For "Cherry Bomb" alone, the band deserves a spot.

Björk: The Icelandic experimentalist qualifies this early because of a childhood release few have heard. It's tough to come up with a more original voice in late 20 th -century popular music.

Kate Bush: Legendary in England since taking the island by storm in her teens, Bush quietly influenced a generation of American singer-songwriters who'd emerge a decade later as the Lilith Fair generation. Also, one of the first artists to extensively combine synthesizers and rock elements.

Lucinda Williams: The Americana subgenre wouldn't exist without this Mississippi poet of the everyday, and no one rocks harder on songs like "Changed the Locks" and "Joy."

The Weather Girls: A tough year to choose, since the all-woman band the Go-Go's also qualify, but the duo that gave dance music its most potent injection of joy, with songs like "It's Raining Men," deserve a spot.

Eurythmics: Annie Lennox. One of the greatest voices popular music has known, with one of the most influential personae. Say no more.

Cocteau Twins:1982 was defined by mixed-gender bands from Sonic Youth to Everything But the Girl Liz Fraser's reinvention of language itself in this hard-to-categorize combo had the most impact.

Cyndi Lauper: Lauper was the Everywoman we needed and a fearless songwriter tackling subjects like self-pleasure and self-determination for teenage girls.

Roxanne Shante: at fourteen, this kid from Queens turned the answer record into a foundational hip hop element and cemented her place in history.

Indigo Girls: Besides being an unstoppable generator of irresistible singalongs, this duo defined a path for LGBTQI musicians to sustain community while still making a mark on the pop charts.

Salt n Pepa: With Spinderella on the decks, the trio uniting Brooklyn and Queens brought rap to the millions and spoke up for women's independence and sensuality in karaoke favorites like "Push It."

Sinead O'Connor: One of the fiercest and most delicate souls to ever step into a recording studio, O'Connor remains unique, a true fusion artist who can make deeply personal observations universal.

Kylie Minogue: Melissa Etheridge also deserves a spot from this year, but if the Rock Hall truly wants to be international it should recognize Australia's biggest pop star.

Queen Latifah: Newark's unofficial mayor showed that a rapper could have serious chops, movie star appeal, and a wide-ranging sense of history as she grew to incorporate blues and jazz into her repertoire.

Mariah Carey: Carey is exactly the kind of high-gloss pop star the Hall once considered antithetical to its values. Time has revealed, however, that what some once dismissed as fluff, others took to heart as the soundtrack of their lives – and her diva charisma and astounding voice remain intact.

PJ Harvey: It's a tough toss-up among Tori Amos, Polly Harvey and Alanis Morrissette – what a year this was! – but the English guitarist, songwriter and supreme howler grabbed rock so hard it changed shape, and so claims the spot.

Dixie Chicks: By the mid-1990s country was fully showing its rock roots again, and no one expressed the music's fierce spirit of independence more powerfully than the Texas trio whose bold ways challenged the genre's traditionalists in unprecedented ways. (Alternate pick: R&B queen Mary J. Blige, also a genre-changer.)

Sheryl Crow: Versatile, emotionally brilliant and an expert at songcraft, Crow has played by every rule the Hall sets own for qualification and won over and over.

Sleater-Kinney: How many women have started bands inspired by the joy and power the classic Northwest trio projects? Countless numbers.

Robyn: Turning dance music into singer-songwriterly autofiction and pop shine into an energy that defeats genre, Robyn ushered in a new century's way of loving and making music.

Correction Jan. 15, 2020

An earlier version of this story incorrectly called Carole King's Tapestry the fifth-bestselling album of all time.


Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Announces ‘Most Diverse Class’ In Its History

Brian Ach/Getty Images for Something in the Water

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame announced its inductees for this year, noting that it is the most diverse class in its history.

Rolling Stone reported that joining the class of 2021 in the Performers category are Foo Fighters , The Go-Go’s, Jay-Z , Carole King , Todd Rundgren , and Tina Turner .

“This is our most diverse class in the history of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame,” said chairman John Sykes, who is also IHeartMedia’s President of Entertainment Enterprises. “It really represents the Hall’s ongoing commitment to honor the artists that have created not only rock and roll but the sound of youth culture.”

Dave Grohl, Tina Turner, and Carole King will enter the Hall of Fame for the second time. Rolling Stone reported, “King was inducted along with her former songwriting partner Gerry Goffin in 1990 as a non-performer, Tina Turner entered in 1991 as half of the Ike & Tina Turner duo, and Grohl was brought in as Nirvana’s drummer in 2014.”

“It’s very difficult to get inducted twice and we have three this year,” said Sykes. “It’s also a rare year where three of the six inductees are women: Tina, Carole, and the Go-Gos. It just shows the continued power and relevance and recognition of women in music.”

This year, there are more inductees outside of the Performers category than the event usually includes. The outlet reported that while most years there are two or three of those inductees, this year will have seven.

“That’s because we’ve really created, for the first time this year, special committees that actually nominate and induct artists,” said Sykes. “These are very diverse committees that actually include artists themselves like [Run-DMC’s] Darryl McDaniels, Little Steven, and Tom Morello.”

LL Cool J , Billy Preston, and Randy Rhoads will get the Musical Excellence Award while Kraftwerk , Gil Scott Heron, and Charley Patton will receive the Early Influence Award. Sussex Records founder Clarence Avant will get the Ahmet Ertegun Award.

Rolling Stone said that LL Cool J and Kraftwerk were both nominated six times in past years, but did not get through with the regular procedures. Giving them the Musical Excellence and Early Influence awards allows them to go around the voters.

In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, many are eager to get back to in-person events after the world adapted to a mostly virtual environment over the past year. Induction ceremonies in the past have taken place at the Public Hall, which seats 10,000 people. This year, however, the event is being moved to the Rocket Mortgage FieldHouse which seats 20,000 people.

“We just needed more room,” said Sykes. “Tickets go so fast and we wanted to have as many people from the Cleveland area be able to attend the show as possible.”

Sykes discussed the ceremony in light of the COVID-19 pandemic and a return to normalcy. “I think we’re going to see this fall as the very beginnings of the reopening of live music in America,” said Sykes, who noted that the event will comply with COVID-19 guidelines. “An event like the Rock and Roll of Fame induction ceremony will be a precursor of what we’re all looking forward to getting back to in 2022.”

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Jay-Z leads Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductees — among some head-scratchers

Jay-Z may have “99 Problems,” but getting into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame isn’t one of them.

The Brooklyn-born rapper — who changed the game with such hits as “Hard Knock Life (Ghetto Anthem),” “Big Pimpin’,” “Izzo (H.O.V.A.)” and, of course, his No. 1 smash “Empire State of Mind” — made history as the first living solo rapper to be inducted into the rock hall when the class of 2021 was announced on Wednesday morning.

Getting in on his first year of eligibility — which is 25 years after an artist’s debut record — Jay-Z is just the third solo rapper to join music’s exclusive club, following posthumous inductions for Tupac Shakur (2017) and the Notorious B.I.G. (2020).

Hova leads a diverse group of acts being immortalized in the RRHOF, including Foo Fighters, Tina Turner, Carole King, the Go-Go’s and Todd Rundgren.

Jay-Z is among the 2021 Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductees. RAVEN VARONA/Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

Like Jay-Z, Foo Fighters made the cut in their first year of eligibility. It marks the second induction for Foo frontman Dave Grohl, who had already booked his seat in the rock hall with Nirvana.

Dave Grohl of Foo Fighters AFP via Getty Images

Turner and King are also now two-time inductees: Turner — who was previously enshrined 30 years ago as one-half of Ike and Tina Turner in 1991 — is now getting much-deserved love as a solo artist. Meanwhile, King, who was inducted as a songwriter in 1990, is being recognized as a performer 50 years after her classic 1971 album “Tapestry.”

While it’s hard to argue with Jay-Z, Foo Fighters, Turner and King getting a place in the rock hall, it’s a little surprising that the ’80s girl group the Go-Go’s made it in on their first nomination. Especially when you consider that “I’m Every Woman” singer Chaka Khan was nominated for the sixth time — her third solo nod, in addition to three with Rufus featuring Chaka Khan.

And did the Go-Go’s really deserve to beat Kate Bush, the New York Dolls and Rage Against the Machine into the RRHOF?

Rundgren’s induction on his third nomination reinforces the rock hall’s tired tendency toward white male classic rockers. He got the call over such artists as Mary J. Blige, LL Cool J and Dionne Warwick — a long overdue first-time nominee — who would have contributed to more diverse representation. (While not breaking through in the performer category, LL did receive the musical excellence award.)

Still, three of the six inductees are female artists, which is certainly a better showing for women than the RRHOF has managed in most years.

And after COVID-19 ruined the party last year, it will be great that there can be an actual ceremony to celebrate the inductees in October at the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland, Ohio.


The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame named 13 new inductees including Foo Fighters, Jay-Z and Tina Turner

The Foo Fighters and others made this year's list of honorees to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

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NEW YORK (AP) — Jay-Z, Foo Fighters and the Go-Go’s were elected Wednesday to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame their first time on the ballot, leading a class that also includes Tina Turner, Carole King and Todd Rundgren.

Each will be honored during an induction ceremony in Cleveland on Oct. 30 before what organizers hope is a full house of fans enjoying live music again.

The hall will also welcome LL Cool J, Billy Preston and Randy Rhoads with musical excellence awards, and honor Kraftwerk, Gil Scott Heron and Charley Patton as early influencers.

With Jay-Z, the hall inducts a 23-time Grammy winner and the first rap artist in the Songwriters Hall of Fame. His discography includes “Hard Knock Life,” “99 Problems” and “Empire State of Mind.” He has had 14 No. 1 albums to his credit.

After serving as Nirvana’s drummer, Dave Grohl stepped to center stage with Foo Fighters, becoming one of the few modern rock bands comfortable in arenas. Their hard-hitting sound produced the hits “Best of You,” “Everlong” and “Times Like These.”

As an all-female band that played their own instruments, the Go-Go’s were a relative rarity in the early 1980s. Born from Los Angeles’ punk rock scene, they had a string of melodic hits that included “We Got the Beat,” “Our Lips Are Sealed” and “Vacation.”

Turner, recently celebrated in an HBO T, +0.17% documentary, was one of rock’s most stirring comeback stories. After escaping from an abusive relationship with husband and musical partner Ike Turner, she became a solo star in the 1980s behind the world-weary “What’s Love Got to Do With It,” and scored other hits with “Private Dancer” and “We Don’t Need Another Hero.”

King’s life was celebrated in the Broadway musical “Beautiful: The Carole King Musical.” Stepping forward following a career writing songs for others, her 1971 album “Tapestry” became one of music’s best-selling albums of all time. Hits include “It’s Too Late,” “You’ve Got a Friend” and “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman.”

A power pop pioneer, Rundgren is known for melodic hits like “Hello It’s Me,” “I Saw the Light” and “We Gotta Get You a Woman.” With “Bang the Drum All Day,” he’s also responsible for the song most celebrated by hooky players everywhere.

Clarence Avant, a former manager, label owner and concert organizer, is being given the Ahmet Ertegun Award as a non-performer. His impact on the music industry was highlighted in the 2019 Netflix NFLX, +1.73% documentary, “The Black Godfather.”

Grohl, King and Turner bring the number of artists inducted into the Rock Hall twice to 26. Prior to King and Turner, Stevie Nicks had been the only woman with that distinction.

Two new inductees — Belinda Carlisle of the Go-Go’s and Pat Smear of Foo Fighters — were once members of the L.A. punk band the Germs before getting the jobs that led to later fame.

Before getting into the hall in their special categories, both LL Cool J and Kraftwerk had each been nominated six times as performers without being elected.

Five of the six inducted performers are still working artists. Only Turner is retired, and no doubt the hall will try recruiting Beyoncé — she should be in town anyway — to pay tribute onstage. Either way, the hall is hoping for one of the first big concerts since the live music business essentially shut down because of the coronavirus pandemic.

“We really see it as a true celebration of the reopening of music — not only in America but in the world,” John Sykes, chairman of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Foundation, said in an interview with The Associated Press.

The induction ceremony, to be held at the Rocket Mortgage Fieldhouse in Cleveland, will simulcast on SiriusXM SIRI, +1.56% and air later on HBO.

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Rock & Roll Hall of Fame to induct Jay-Z, Carole King, Go-Go’s, Tina Turner, Todd Rundgren and Foo Fighters

Jay-Z, Foo Fighters and the Go-Go’s were elected Wednesday to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame their first time on the ballot, leading a class that also includes Tina Turner, Carole King and Todd Rundgren.

Each will be honored during an induction ceremony in Cleveland on Oct. 30 before what organizers hope is a full house of fans enjoying live music again.

The hall will also welcome LL Cool J, Billy Preston and Randy Rhoads with musical excellence awards, and honor Kraftwerk, Gil Scott Heron and Charley Patton as early influencers.

With Jay-Z, the hall inducts a 23-time Grammy winner and the first rap artist in the Songwriters Hall of Fame. His discography includes “Hard Knock Life,” “99 Problems” and “Empire State of Mind.” He has had 14 No. 1 albums to his credit.

After serving as Nirvana’s drummer, Dave Grohl stepped to center stage with Foo Fighters, becoming one of the few modern rock bands comfortable in arenas. Their hard-hitting sound produced the hits “Best of You,” “Everlong” and “Times Like These.”

As an all-female band that played their own instruments, the Go-Go’s were a relative rarity in the early 1980s. Born from Los Angeles’ punk rock scene, they had a string of melodic hits that included “We Got the Beat,” “Our Lips Are Sealed” and “Vacation.”

Turner, recently celebrated in an HBO documentary, was one of rock’s most stirring comeback stories. After escaping from an abusive relationship with husband and musical partner Ike Turner, she became a solo star in the 1980s behind the world-weary “What’s Love Got to Do With It,” and scored other hits with “Private Dancer” and “We Don’t Need Another Hero.”

King’s life was celebrated in the Broadway musical “Beautiful: The Carole King Musical.” Stepping forward following a career writing songs for others, her 1971 album “Tapestry” became one of music’s best-selling albums of all time. Hits include “It’s Too Late,” “You’ve Got a Friend” and “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman.”

A power pop pioneer, Rundgren is known for melodic hits like “Hello It’s Me,” “I Saw the Light” and “We Gotta Get You a Woman.” With “Bang the Drum All Day,” he’s also responsible for the song most celebrated by hooky players everywhere.

Clarence Avant, a former manager, label owner and concert organizer, is being given the Ahmet Ertegun Award as a non-performer. His impact on the music industry was highlighted in the 2019 Netflix documentary, “The Black Godfather.”

Grohl, King and Turner bring the number of artists inducted into the Rock Hall twice to 26. Prior to King and Turner, Stevie Nicks had been the only woman with that distinction.

Two new inductees — Belinda Carlisle of the Go-Go’s and Pat Smear of Foo Fighters — were once members of the L.A. punk band the Germs before getting the jobs that led to later fame.

Before getting into the hall in their special categories, both LL Cool J and Kraftwerk had each been nominated six times as performers without being elected.

Five of the six inducted performers are still working artists. Only Turner is retired, and no doubt the hall will try recruiting Beyoncé — she should be in town anyway — to pay tribute onstage. Either way, the hall is hoping for one of the first big concerts since the live music business essentially shut down because of the coronavirus pandemic.

“We really see it as a true celebration of the reopening of music — not only in America but in the world,” John Sykes, chairman of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Foundation, said in an interview with The Associated Press.

The induction ceremony, to be held at the Rocket Mortgage Fieldhouse in Cleveland, will simulcast on SiriusXM and air later on HBO.


Contents

The RRHOF Foundation was established in 1983 by Ahmet Ertegun, who assembled a team that included Rolling Stone publisher Jann S. Wenner, record executives Seymour Stein, Bob Krasnow, and Noreen Woods, and attorneys Allen Grubman and Suzan Evans. The Foundation began inducting artists in 1986, but the Hall of Fame still had no home. The search committee considered several cities, including Philadelphia (home of Bill Haley and American Bandstand), Memphis (home of Sun Studios and Stax Records), Detroit (home of Motown Records), Cincinnati (home of King Records), New York City, and Cleveland. [2]

Cleveland lobbied for the museum, with civic leaders in Cleveland pledging $65 million in public money to fund the construction, and citing that WJW disc jockey Alan Freed both coined the term "rock and roll" and heavily promoted the new genre—and that Cleveland was the location of Freed's Moondog Coronation Ball, often credited as the first major rock and roll concert. Freed was also a member of the hall of fame's inaugural class of inductees in 1986. [3] In addition, Cleveland cited radio station WMMS, which played a key role in breaking several major acts in the U.S. during the 1970s and 1980s, including David Bowie, who began his first U.S. tour in the city, Bruce Springsteen, Roxy Music, and Rush among many others. [4]

Cleveland business leaders and media companies organized a petition demonstrating the city's support that was signed by 600,000 Northeast Ohio residents, and Cleveland ranked first in a 1986 USA Today poll asking where the Hall of Fame should be located. On May 5, 1986, the Hall of Fame Foundation chose Cleveland as the permanent home of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum. Author Peter Guralnick said the hall should have been located in Memphis in a 2016 interview. [5] Cleveland may also have been chosen as the organization's site because the city offered the best financial package. As The Plain Dealer music critic Michael Norman noted, "It was $65 million . Cleveland wanted it here and put up the money."

During early discussions on where to build the Hall of Fame and Museum, the Foundation's board considered a site along the Cuyahoga River in downtown Cleveland. Ultimately, the chosen location was along East Ninth Street in downtown by Lake Erie, east of Cleveland Stadium. At one point in the planning phase, when a financing gap existed, planners proposed locating the Rock Hall in the then-vacant May Company Building but finally decided to commission architect I. M. Pei to design a new building. Initial CEO Dr. Larry R. Thompson facilitated I. M. Pei in designs for the site. Pei came up with the idea of a tower with a glass pyramid protruding from it. Pei initially planned the tower to be 200 feet (61 m) high, but was forced to reduce it to 162 feet (49 m) due to the structure's proximity to Burke Lakefront Airport. The building's base is approximately 150,000 square feet (14,000 m 2 ).

The groundbreaking ceremony took place on June 7, 1993. Pete Townshend, Chuck Berry, Billy Joel, Sam Phillips, Ruth Brown, Sam Moore of Sam and Dave, Carl Gardner of the Coasters and Dave Pirner of Soul Asylum all appeared at the groundbreaking. [6]

The museum was dedicated on September 1, 1995, with the ribbon being cut by an ensemble that included Yoko Ono and Little Richard, among others, before a crowd of more than 10,000 people. The following night an all-star concert was held at Cleveland Stadium. [7] It featured Chuck Berry, Bob Dylan, Al Green, Jerry Lee Lewis, Aretha Franklin, Bruce Springsteen, Iggy Pop, John Fogerty, John Mellencamp, and many others. [6]

In addition to the Hall of Fame inductees, the museum documents the entire history of rock and roll, regardless of induction status. Hall of Fame inductees are honored in a special exhibit located in a wing that juts out over Lake Erie. [6]

Since 1986, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame has selected new inductees. The formal induction ceremony has been held in New York City 26 times (1986–92, 1994–96, 1998–2008, 2010–11, 2014, 2016, 2017, and 2019) twice in Los Angeles (1993 and 2013) and five times in the hall of fame's home in Cleveland (1997, 2009, 2012, 2015, and 2018). As of 2018, the induction ceremonies alternate each year between New York and Cleveland. [8]

The 2009 and 2012 induction weeks were made possible by a public–private partnership between the City of Cleveland, the State of Ohio, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and local foundations, corporations, civic organizations and individuals. Collectively these entities invested $5.8 million in 2009 and $7.9 million in 2012 to produce a week of events including free concerts, a gospel celebration, exhibition openings, free admission to the museum, and induction ceremonies at Public Hall. [9]

Millions viewed the television broadcast of the Cleveland inductions tens of thousands traveled to Ohio during induction week to participate in the events. The economic impact of the 2009 induction week activities was more than $13 million, and it provided an additional $20 million in media exposure for the region. The 2012 induction week yielded similar results. [10]

Layout Edit

The building contains seven levels. On the lower level is the Ahmet M. Ertegun Exhibition Hall, the museum's main gallery. It includes exhibits on the roots of rock and roll (gospel, blues, rhythm & blues and folk, country and bluegrass). It also features exhibits on cities that have had a major impact on rock and roll: Memphis, Detroit, London, Liverpool, San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York, and Seattle. There are exhibits about soul music, the Fifties, Sun Records, hip hop music, Cleveland's rock and roll legacy, the music of the Midwest, rock and roll radio and dee-jays, and the many protests against rock and roll. This gallery also has exhibits that focus on individual artists, including the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, Jimi Hendrix and others. Finally, the Ahmet M. Ertegun Exhibition Hall includes a theatre that features films on various subjects such as American Bandstand. [11]

The first floor of the museum is the entrance level. It includes a cafe, a stage that the museum uses for various special performances and events throughout the year, and a section called "Backstage Stories". The second floor includes several interactive kiosks that feature programs on one-hit wonders and the Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll. This level also includes a gallery with artifact-filled exhibits about Les Paul, Alan Freed, Sam Phillips and the evolution of audio technology. [12]

Visitors enter the Hall of Fame section of the museum on the third floor. This section includes "The Power of Rock Experience", which includes one of Jonathan Demme's final works, a film shown in the Connor Theater. The film includes musical highlights from some of the Hall's induction ceremonies. [13] Visitors exit the Hall of Fame section on the fourth floor. That level features the Foster Theater, a state-of-the-art 3-D theater that is used for special events and programs. [14] [15]

Finally, the top two levels of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame feature large, temporary exhibits. Over the years, numerous exhibits have been installed on these two levels, including exhibits about Elvis Presley, hip-hop, the Supremes, the Who, U2, John Lennon, the Clash, the Grateful Dead, Bruce Springsteen, Women Who Rock, and the Rolling Stones.

Architecture Edit

Designed by I. M. Pei and structurally engineered by Leslie E. Robertson Associates, the building rises above the shores of Lake Erie. It is a combination of geometric forms and cantilevered spaces that are anchored by a 162-foot tower. The tower supports a dual-triangular-shaped glass "tent" that extends (at its base) onto a 65,000-square-foot plaza that provides a main entry facade. [ citation needed ]

The building houses more than 55,000 square feet of exhibition space, as well as administrative offices, a store, and a café. [ citation needed ]

"In designing this building," Pei said, "it was my intention to echo the energy of rock and roll. I have consciously used an architectural vocabulary that is bold and new, and I hope the building will become a dramatic landmark for the city of Cleveland and for fans of rock and roll around the world." [16]

New York City Annex Edit

In 2006 the RRHOF partnered with three entertainment production companies to create a branch museum in New York City. [17] On November 18, 2008, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Annex NYC opened in Manhattan's SoHo district. [17] Located at 76 Mercer Street just west of Broadway, the Annex occupied an underground space of 25,000 square feet (2,300 m 2 ). [17] The branch museum operated in much the same way as its Cleveland parent, featuring archetypal display pieces like Prince's coat from Purple Rain, David Byrne's "big suit" from Stop Making Sense, and Elvis Presley's motorcycle jacket and his Bible. [17] But from its start the Annex also had a distinct New York area focus that made plenty of space for big items like the phone booth from CBGB, layered thick with band stickers over the decades Bruce Springsteen's own 1957 Chevrolet a special gallery reserved for the city's musicians and an intricate 26-foot (7.9 m) scale model of Manhattan highlighting sites of rock history. [17]

Jann Wenner served as chairman of the board of the Annex. [18] At its opening night gala, he inadvertently created a controversy after he told a reporter, "One of the small sad things is we didn't do it in New York in the first place." [18] He later expressed regret for his remark which he said had been misconstrued and clarified that "I am absolutely delighted that the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum is in Cleveland." [18]

The Annex closed on January 3, 2010, its quick demise reportedly due to the global financial crisis of 2007–2008 and a subsequent downturn in the city's tourism. [19] The museum closed with a final major exhibition on John Lennon and his years in New York City. [19]

Since 1997, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame has featured numerous temporary exhibits that range in size from major exhibits that fill the top two floors of the museum to smaller exhibits that are often installed in the main exhibition hall on the lower level.

The museum's first major exhibit opened on May 10, 1997. It was called I Want to Take You Higher: The Psychedelic Era, 1965–1969. It included memorabilia from numerous artists including John Lennon, Eric Clapton, John Sebastian, Jefferson Airplane, and Janis Joplin, as well as items related to the 1967 Monterey Pop Festival and 1969's Woodstock. [20]

That exhibit was followed by Elvis is in the Building, which ran from August 8, 1998, to September 5, 1999. This year-long tribute was the first exhibit devoted to a single artist, Elvis Presley—the "King of Rock and Roll" and the first inductee into the RRHOF, in 1986. Graceland supplied a significant selection of representative artifacts for this special tribute spanning Elvis' life and legendary career. [21] Next, the museum curated Roots, Rhymes and Rage: The Hip-Hop Story. [22] That was the first major museum exhibit to focus on hip-hop. It ran from November 11, 1999, to August 6, 2000. It was followed by Rock Style, an exhibit that focused on rock and roll and fashion. It featured clothing from Buddy Holly to Alice Cooper, from Ray Charles to David Bowie and from Smokey Robinson to Sly Stone. After it closed in Cleveland, Rock Style traveled to other museums in the U.S.

Other temporary exhibits have included Lennon: His Life and Work, which ran from October 20, 2000, to January 1, 2003. It was followed by In the Name of Love: Two Decades of U2 and then Reflections: The Mary Wilson Supreme Legacy Collection. A major exhibition titled Louder than Words: Rock, Power, Politics was on display during the 2016 Republican National Convention in Cleveland. [23] [24]

Other large temporary exhibits have focused on the Clash (Revolution Rock: The Story of the Clash), the Doors (Break on Through: The Lasting Legacy of the Doors), the Who's Tommy (Tommy: The Amazing Journey), and Bruce Springsteen (From Asbury Park to the Promised Land: The Life and Music of Bruce Springsteen). Another thematic temporary exhibit focused on the role of women in rock and roll (Women Who Rock: Vision, Passion, Power). Many of these exhibits travel to other museums after closing in Cleveland. A major temporary exhibit in 2017 told the story and impact of Rolling Stone magazine. [25]

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame also curates many smaller temporary exhibits. Over the years, these exhibits have focused on such topics as the Vans Warped Tour, the Concert for Bangladesh, Woodstock's 40th and 50th anniversaries, Austin City Limits, the Monterey International Pop Festival, Roy Orbison, Motown's 50th anniversary, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, Marty Stuart, Paul Simon, Graham Nash, John Mellencamp, and Geddy Lee's basses.

The museum also devotes exhibits to photography and artwork related to rock and roll. Among the photographers whose work has been featured at the Hall of Fame are George Kalinsky, Alfred Wertheimer, Tommy Edwards, Kevin Mazur, Janet Macoska, Lynn Goldsmith, Linda McCartney, Mike McCartney, Robert Alford, [26] and George Shuba. The museum also featured the artwork of Philip Burke in one of its temporary exhibits, and a later exhibit featured Herb Ritts. [27]

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum produces numerous public programs, including concerts, interviews, lectures, film screenings, and other events that help tell the story of rock and roll. Every February, the museum celebrates Black History Month by hosting concerts, film screenings and lectures that illustrate the important role African-Americans have played in the history of rock and roll. [28] Since the program began in 1996, such artists as Robert Lockwood, Jr., the Temptations, Charles Brown, Ruth Brown, the Ohio Players, Lloyd Price, Little Anthony and the Imperials, and Al Green have appeared at the museum during Black History Month.

Another program is the Hall of Fame Series. This series began in April 1996 and features interviews with Hall of Fame inductees in rare and intimate settings, most often in the Museum's Foster Theater. The interviews are usually followed by a question-and-answer session with the audience and, often, a performance by the inductee. Among the inductees who have taken part in this series are Darryl "DMC" McDaniels of Run-D.M.C., Lloyd Price, Martha Reeves, Marky Ramone, Seymour Stein, Ray Manzarek of the Doors, Mary Wilson of the Supremes, Ronnie Spector, Bootsy Collins, Ann and Nancy Wilson of Heart, Dennis Edwards of the Temptations, and Jorma Kaukonen of the Jefferson Airplane.

A similar program is the Legends Series. The only real difference between this program and the Hall of Fame Series is that it features artists who have not yet been inducted into the Hall of Fame. Peter Hook of Joy Division, Spinderella of Salt n Pepa, Tommy James, and the Chi-Lites are among the artists who have participated in the Legends Series.

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum's most acclaimed program is the annual American Music Masters series. Each year the museum celebrates one of the Hall's inductees with a week-long series of programs that include interviews, film screenings, and, often, a special exhibit. The celebration ends with an all-star concert held at a Cleveland theater. The concerts include a diverse mix of artists, from Hall of Fame inductees to contemporary musicians.

The American Music Masters series began in 1996 with Hard Travelin': The Life and Legacy of Pete Seeger. Since then, the programs have honored the following inductees: Jimmie Rodgers (1997), Robert Johnson (1998), Louis Jordan (1999), Muddy Waters (2000), Bessie Smith (2001), Hank Williams (2002), Buddy Holly (2003), Lead Belly (2004), Sam Cooke (2005), Roy Orbison (2006), Jerry Lee Lewis (2007), Les Paul (2008), [29] Janis Joplin (2009), [30] Fats Domino and Dave Bartholomew (2010), Aretha Franklin (2011), [31] Chuck Berry (2012), [32] The Everly Brothers (2014) and Johnny Cash (2017). [33] In 2019 the concert series' format was retooled and the event was renamed the Rock Hall Honors, in which the honored performer is joined in concert by guests of their choice. [33] The first Rock Hall Honors concert, featuring Mavis Staples, was performed in Cleveland in September 2019. [34]

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame won the 2020 Webby People's Voice Award for Cultural Institution in the category Web. [35]

Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll Edit

Hall of Fame museum curator James Henke, along with "the museum's curatorial staff and numerous rock critics and music experts", created an unordered list of "500 Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll". [36] [37] The list is part of a permanent exhibit at the museum, and was envisioned as part of the museum from its opening in 1995. [38] It contains songs recorded from the 1920s through the 1990s. The oldest song on the list is "Wabash Cannonball", written circa 1882 and credited to J. A. Roff. Since then, however, an additional 160 songs have been added, and the list is now simply referred to as "The Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll". The most recent songs on the list are Gnarls Barkley's "Crazy" and My Chemical Romance's "Welcome to the Black Parade", both released in 2006. [39] The Beatles and the Rolling Stones are the most represented on the 660-song list, with eight songs each.


Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inducts first woman - HISTORY

In 1986, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame announced its first group of inductees: Buddy Holly, Chuck Berry, Elvis Presley, Fats Domino, James Brown, Jerry Lee Lewis, Little Richard, Ray Charles, Sam Cooke and the Everly Brothers. Since then, the Hall has added a new class of inductees each year, expanding by January 2008 to 209 honorees in four categories: Performers, Non-Performers, Sidemen and Lifetime Achievers. The category in which the Hall is most conspicuously lacking, however, is women. Of the 159 total inductions in the Performers category, 135 have been of solo male performers or male groups. Only 10 solo female performers and 13 groups containing at least one female performer have been added since the Hall admitted its first woman—Aretha Franklin—on January 3, 1987.

A combination of history and Hall of Fame policy help explain the gender imbalance. To be considered for induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, candidates must have released their first album at least 25 years earlier. This means that in its first ten years of existence, the Hall of Fame considered only female rock and roll figures from the 1960s and earlier, a period during which there were relatively few prominent women working in what would generally be considered rock and roll. There was Aretha, there were girl groups like the Supremes and Martha and the Vandellas (inducted in 1988 and 1995, respectively) and there was Tina Turner (inducted with Ike in 1991), but beyond those obvious choices, the Hall had to look to three women—LaVern Baker, Etta James and Ruth Brown—who were really more R&B than rock and roll.

In its second 10 years, women fared better with the Hall of Fame as artists like the Jefferson Airplane (1996), Joni Mitchell (1997), Bonnie Raitt (2000) and the Pretenders (2005) became eligible for induction. Still, considering how few female artists and groups are likely to be given serious consideration in the coming years—Heart? Joan Jett? Chaka Khan?—the Hall’s roster of honorees is a striking reflection of how much rock and roll really has been, and continues to be, a man’s world.

For the record, the solo women and groups containing women who have been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as of 2008 are (in order of induction):


Aretha Franklin Made History as First Woman Inducted into Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

While reminiscing on the life of Aretha Franklin, it has re-emerged that she made history as the first woman to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

As Fox News reports, Franklin was made a member of the group in 1987, which was after the musical icon had racked up 20 number one singles.

"I don&rsquot think there&rsquos anybody I have known who possesses an instrument like hers and who has such a thorough background in gospel, the blues and the essential black-music idiom,&rdquo co-founder of Atlantic Records Ahmet Ertegun said of Franklin, as recorded on the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame website.

"She is blessed with an extraordinary combination of remarkable urban sophistication and deep blues feeling. The result is maybe the greatest singer of our time," he added.

Some of Franklin's other notable accolades include 44 Grammy nominations with 18 wins, becoming the youngest ever recipient of Kennedy Center Honors at the age of 52, and being award both the Grammy Legend Award and the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award.

In the wake of her passing, many of Franklin's celebrity friends and fans have taken to social media to pay tribute to the fallen "Queen of Soul."

Aretha Franklin QUEEN of Soul, voice of a generation, one of a kind,took no crap+she didn't fly, she wore fur 2 an inauguration & dared someone2 say something,she is now in the pantheon of Gods greats,in the busom of family. She was my friend,condolences 2her family&2 us all pic.twitter.com/ax6h48S27g

&mdash Whoopi Goldberg (@WhoopiGoldberg) August 16, 2018

"I can never forget the first time I heard the Queen of Soul Aretha Franklin singing 'Say a Little Prayer', I thought it was the greatest record I ever heard at that stage in my life," tweeted singer Billy Ocean. "She will be the greatest singing Angel in heaven! May her soul and spirit rest in peace."

"Happy memories of being with Aretha on movie sets and industry events. The Queen had a wry, skeptical eye on the world but once you got her laughing you were in. What a voice! What a soul. Angel choirs should prepare for increased rehearsal and discipline."

&mdash Dan Aykroyd (@dan_aykroyd) August 16, 2018

"Everyone loves [Aretha Franklin] she is the powerhouse voice of my life. No one can touch her passion and soul," said legendary guitar player Peter Frampton. "We have used 'Rock Steady' as the track we hear [before] we go on stage for years. Her greatness as singer/piano player inspire me to reach for the unattainable."

Franklin passed away this week after being hospitalized for a couple days and spending a couple days in hospice care. She was 76 years old.


Rock Hall Inducts First Class

The first inductees into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame include Elvis Presley, Chuck Berry and Fats Domino.

Led by Atlantic Records' founder Ahmet Ertegun, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Foundation was formed in 1983 to recognize the pioneering figures of the genre, including performers (eligible for consideration 25 years after the release of their first single), producers and engineers. The annual event becomes a point of contention for many snubbed artists who call it an over-hyped popularity contest, but no one can dispute the roster of tonight's honorees. The first induction ceremony is held at New York City's Waldorf-Astoria, and welcomes some of rock's most influential trailblazers, including Elvis Presley, Fats Domino, Buddy Holly, Little Richard, Ray Charles, Sam Cooke, James Brown, Jerry Lee Lewis, and the The Everly Brothers. Keith Richards, who joins Berry on stage with "Reelin' and Rockin'," inducts his hero, quipping, "It's very difficult for me to talk about Chuck Berry because I lifted every lick he ever played." Meanwhile, Billy Gibbons of ZZ Top salutes the inaugural class for setting a crazy high standard for future rockers: "We get the beat from Bo [Diddley], we got the poetry from Chuck, and we got the insane madness vocal from Little Richard. Those three combined, if you could possibly invent something beyond that, we'd be on another planet - but I think we're already there anyway (laughs)." Non-performers also get their due, with honors for Cleveland disc jockey Alan Freed, who is credited with coining the phrase "rock 'n' roll," and Sun Records founder Sam Phillips. Columbia Records A&R man John Hammond snags the first Lifetime Achievement Award in recognition of his keen eye for talent, with Billie Holiday, Aretha Franklin and Bob Dylan among his biggest discoveries. The highlight of the evening is what becomes the most-anticipated moment in future ceremonies: the jam session. Backed by Late Night with David Letterman's house band, The World's Most Dangerous Band, rock's past and present collide onstage for an all-star jam. Inductees rock out alongside guests Billy Joel, Steve Winwood, John Fogerty, Neil Young and ZZ Top to a set packed with seminal tunes like "Johnny B. Goode," "The Twist," and "Great Balls of Fire."


Watch the video: Rock N Roll Hall Of Fame